Review: Crank by Ellen Hopkins

Crank (Crank, #1)Published: October 1st, 2004, by Margaret K. McElderry Books
Format: Kindle Edition
Pages: 537

Kristina Georgia Snow is the perfect daughter: gifted high school junior, quiet, never any trouble.  But on a trip to visit her absentee father, Kristina disappears and Bree takes her place.  Bree is the exact opposite of Kristina – she’s fearless.

Through a boy, Bree meets the monster: crank.  And what begins a wild, ecstatic ride turns into a struggle through hell for her mind, her soul – her life.

Crank is a novel written in verse, so it is an extremely quick read despite its 537 pages. I ended up picking it up for my eReader when it was on sale, and while I enjoyed it, I think it’s a hard book to review in a lot of ways. There were some pretty horrifying and sad scenes, and Kristina could also be a frustrating narrator, but I finished the book in 1-2 days, so I guess it’s clear that I enjoyed reading it despite my issues.

I periodically found it a bit hard to follow, but was usually to pick things back up again after rereading a couple of lines. Reading it on the eReader was a little weird from time to time – I had the font size as small as it would go, but still had to turn it sometimes so that the lines would display the way they were originally intended. I think a paperback copy of this would probably be easiest to read, but I generally wasn’t too inconvenienced by the formatting issues because they were usually pretty easy to recognize and sort out quickly.

I didn’t really understand the alter-ego stuff with Kristina/Bree, but I eventually just accepted it. Bree almost seemed like a coping mechanism for Kristina at times, a way to distance her old life from the new. I found that interesting, but also sad. Knowing Crank is loosely based off Hopkins’ daughter’s experiences really makes parts of the book hit home, and Kristina’s decline is swift and disturbing. I am interested in continuing with the series, but Crank was a pretty heavy read despite being quick, so I may wait for a bit before continuing.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Review: Earth & Sky by Megan Crewe

Earth & Sky (Earth & Sky, #1)Published: October 28, 2014 by Amazon Children’s Publishing
Format: e-ARC
Pages: 336

Seventeen-year-old Skylar has been haunted for as long as she can remember by fleeting yet powerful sensations that something is horribly wrong.  But despite the panic attacks tormenting her, nothing ever happens, and Sky’s beginning to think she’s crazy.  Then she meets a mysterious, otherworldly boy named Win and discovers the shocking truth her premonitions have tapped into: our world no longer belongs to us.  For thousands of years, Earth has been at the mercy of alien scientists who care nothing for its inhabitants and are using us as the unwitting subjects of their time-manipulating experiments.  Win belongs to a rebel faction seeking to put a stop to it, and he needs Skylar’s help – but with each shift in the past, the very fabric of reality is unraveling, and soon there be no Earth left to save.

Earth and Sky gives us a different type of protagonist – one I couldn’t exactly relate to in some ways, but whom I liked nonetheless. Skylar is definitely different from a lot of other YA protagonists, and I liked that a lot. She’s definitely an unlikely hero in this story, and I liked seeing how she dealt with all that the story threw at her.

There is a love interest, of course, but no love triangle (Can I say YAY?!). Win is interesting, and he definitely isn’t without his faults, and I liked that a lot. While I wasn’t particularly attached to him, I did think he was likable despite some of the downright frustrating or rude things he does, so that was a plus. He may not be the most interesting love interest in YA, but I definitely thought he was on the more likable side of things, and I didn’t hate the romance. It isn’t overbearing, and there is no insta-love, either, so between the no love triangle thing and that, the romance gets quite a few points in my book.

Like other time travel stories, you may need to just throw aside your doubts and enjoy the ride. There were definitely times when I was a bit confused about the time travel aspect and how things would be affected or changed in the present, but eventually I just had to take things at face value, and this book is definitely more enjoyable that way. That said, while a couple of things did throw me a bit, I didn’t have too many issues on that front.

I wish we had gotten to learn a little more about Skylar’s life in the present, because by the end of the book, the details from the beginning were a bit fuzzy, having not really been reinforced since early on. I also wanted to know a lot more about the specifics of what was going on and why, but I got enough that it didn’t bug me too much.

I thought the technology used in the book was fairly unique and kind of fun, and I didn’t feel like too much of the science-y stuff went over my head, so that was good. This book was definitely a fun ride, and I am really looking forward to reading the second book in the series ASAP!

I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  Thank you for the opportunity to read this book!

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Review: Frozen by Melissa de la Cruz & Michael Johnston

Frozen (Heart of Dread, #1)Published: September 13, 2013 by Hatchette Children’s Books
Format: e-ARC
Pages: 336

This review is for the first book in the series Heart of Dread.

Welcome to New Vegas, a city once covered in bling, now blanketed in ice.  Like much of the destroyed planet, the place knows only one temperature – freezing.  But some things never change.  The diamond in the ice desert is still a 24-hour hedonistic playground and nothing keeps the crowds away from the casino floors, never mind the rumors about sinister sorcery in its shadows.

At the heart of this city is Natasha Kestel, a young blackjack dealer looking for a way out.  Like many, she’s heard of a mythical land simply called “the Blue.”  They say it’s a paradise, where the sun still shines and the waters are turquoise.  More importantly, it’s a place where Nat won’t be persecuted, even if her darkest secret comes to light.

But passage to the Blue is treacherous, if not impossible, and her only shot is to bet on a ragtag crew of mercenaries led by a cocky runner named Ryan Wesson to take her there.  Danger and deceit await on every corner, even as Nat and Wes find themselves inexorably drawn to each other.  But can true love survive the lies?

Frozen was a really, really weird book. It has really (intentionally) odd punctuation, and capitalization, and in the end, I just couldn’t really get past that. I loved the idea of the world and I wanted to know a lot more about it, but I couldn’t get into the characters.

I really tried to get past the capitalization and stuff, but I had a REALLY hard time with it. It really annoyed me that I couldn’t seem to find a pattern or reason to it, and that kind of preoccupied me for a lot of the book. So while I tried not to let it affect my rating, it did in the end. I found it so distracting that I had a hard time focusing on the story.

I did enjoy the story (what I could focus on), and the world, as I mentioned before, but didn’t care for the characters much, and I’m a person who generally needs to care about characters to enjoy the story, so that was a pretty major problem for me, but I did enjoy what was there enough to want to continue the series in the future. Overall, I enjoyed where the story took me, though I was MAJORLY disappointed about one thing toward the end, something I thought could have been a really interesting twist, but then I was let down… a lot. :(

Another issue I had was that I kept forgetting the book was intended for a YA audience, not because of the writing or anything like that, but because I kept forgetting that the characters are supposed to be 15-17 years old, for the most part. I… did not buy that, at all. They act like teenagers at times, but most of the time, I didn’t feel like the characters were teens at all. Maybe that’s part of the point, that the world being the way it is forced them to grow up, but every time that was brought up I was kind of thrown for a loop. Definitely could have done without that, lol.

I wanted a bit more background on Nat and Wes, and how the world came to be the way it is in the book, but hopefully we’ll get more of that in future installments in the series.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

Review: Day 21 by Kass Morgan

Day 21 (The Hundred, #2)Published: September 16, 2014 by Little, Brown
Format: e-ARC
Pages: 320

This review is for the second book in the series The Hundred.  There are some spoilers for the first book in the blurb.  My review for the first book, The 100, is here.

It’s been twenty-one days since the hundred landed on Earth.  They’re the only humans to set foot on the planet in centuries… or so they thought.  Facing an unknown enemy, Wells attempts to keep the group together.  Clarke strikes out for Mount Weather, in search of other Colonists, while Bellamy is determined to rescue his sister, no matter the cost.  And back on the ship, Glass faces an unthinkable choice between the love of her life and life itself.

Once I finished reading The 100, I moved on to Day 21. I wasn’t a fan of the first book, but having already requested the second one, I figured I would read it next to get it out of the way. Thankfully, Day 21 was a significant improvement over its predecessor. Going into the book knowing it focused a lot more on the romance then on the science fiction aspect helped a lot too, I suspect. :)

A bunch of new characters are introduced in this one, some of them from the original hundred. I liked that we got to know more of them, but it felt like since the narrators were already semi-familiar with them, the reader never got a real introduction to them. It felt like some new names were just thrown in, and that left me feeling really confused for a while. I kept wondering if I should remember the characters from the first book, haha. But it was really nice to be introduced to more of the hundred, especially because I was hoping they’d be more likable than the main characters.

Day 21 has the same structure as The 100, with three POVs on Earth and one on the Colony. While I still felt like this was too many, at least the reader knows the characters now, and in Day 21, we finally get some of the much-longed-for character development that was more or less absent in the first book, due to the fact that the reader gets very little time with each character. I still didn’t really care for the main characters much, but it was still a pretty big improvement!

In terms of world-building, there is a bit of an improvement versus what readers got in the first book, at least on Earth, though I will still disappointed on the “savage Earth” front. One entire section of the ship still remains unexplored, though, so that was pretty underwhelming.

I honestly wasn’t too enthralled with this book, but about 2/3 of the way through, things picked up quite a bit, to the point that I’m interested in checking out the third installment in the series at some point. I still haven’t seen any of the TV show, but I’m considering it, since I’ve heard it’s better than the books. Day 21 was, despite its faults, a solid improvement over The 100, and I am happy that I am looking forward to learning where it’s all going in book three.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Rating: 2 out of 5 stars

Review: The 100 by Kass Morgan

The 100 (The Hundred, #1)Published: September 3, 2013 by Little, Brown
Format: e-ARC
Pages: 323

This review is for the first book in the series The Hundred.

In the future, humans live in city-like spaceships orbiting far above Earth’s toxic atmosphere.  No one knows when, or even if, the long-abandoned planet will be habitable again.  But faced with dwindling resources and a growing populace, government leaders know they must reclaim their homeland… before it’s too late.

Now, one hundred juvenile delinquents are being sent on a high-stakes mission to recolonize Earth.  After a brutal crash landing, the teens arrive on a savagely beautiful planet they’ve only seen from space.  Confronting the dangers of this rugged new world, they struggle to form a tentative community.  But they’re haunted by their past and uncertain about the future.  To survive, they must learn to trust – and even love – again.

This book had an awesome premise. One hundred criminals are sent to Earth to determine if humanity can return there after being ravaged by some kind of nuclear attack three hundred years before. Sign me up! …unfortunately, what The 100 promised in its blurb is not what it delivered, and I was majorly disappointed.

For a book with just over three hundred pages, The 100 covers four different POVs. While I normally don’t mind multiple POVs in a story, four is too many for a book this short. The reader doesn’t really get to spend enough time in anyone’s POV to really get to know them, so as a result, I didn’t find myself attached to anyone. I generally need to be engaged with the characters to enjoy a book, so that was a major problem for me personally. Some of the main characters are flat-out unlikable, and others just aren’t developed enough for me to care.

The reader is also given very little to go on in terms of the two major settings in this book. The Colony is split into three sections: Phoenix, which seems to be for the richer or otherwise more privileged inhabitants of the ship, and Walden and Arcadia, where the poorer or more disadvantaged people live. Other than giving us the information that there is a bridge between the sections of the ship and that each section has a market and residential areas, I finished the book not really knowing what anything looked like or what the general layout was other than that there is a bridge (somewhere) and there is more than one level. There is also one section of the entire ship that we only know of by name and know pretty much nothing about, and none of the characters visits it across the entire three hundred pages of the book, which made me wonder why the ship was split into three parts in the first place, if one of them is basically not even in the book.

It’s also heavily hinted that the Earth the hundred criminals are landing on is going to be a savage, dangerous place, but the reader is given almost no details to differentiate it from Earth as we know it today. The surrounding area the hundred live in is also fairly vague. I never really got a feeling for where they end up living, other than knowing of a few landmarks that are some vague distance away. In the end, what could have been a really interesting, awesome setting just turns into a vague blob with some not-so-vague blobs around it.

It is also important to note that while The 100 frames itself as a science fiction novel with some romance novels, it is more of a romance novel taking place in a sci-fi/post-apocalyptic setting. The focus is definitely first and foremost on the romance, and everything else takes a backseat, to the book’s detriment.

The writing itself wasn’t bad, and I think I could have enjoyed the book had it trimmed the POVs down to two (one on Earth and one on the Colony would have been fine) or even just one, but as it is, I couldn’t get to know any of the characters or the place, which made it really hard for me to care about what was happening. :(

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  Thank you for the opportunity to read this book!

Rating: 1 out of 5 stars

Review: Bird Box by Josh Malerman

Bird BoxPublished: May 13, 2014 by Ecco
Format: Kindle Edition
Pages: 293

Most people ignored the outrageous reports on the news.  But they became too frequent, they became too real.  And soon, they began happening down the street.  Then the Internet died.  The television and radio went silent.  The phones stopped ringing.  And we couldn’t look outside anymore.

Malorie raises children the only way she can; indoors.  The house is quiet.  The doors are locked, the curtains are closed, mattresses are nailed over the windows.  They are out there.  She might let them in.

The children sleep in the bedroom across the hall.  Soon she will have to wake them.  Soon she will have to blindfold them.  Today they must leave the house.  Today they will risk everything.

Imagining a world where opening your eyes could make you go mad really made me think about walking around outside after I finished this book. AHHHHH. I loved Bird Box. I hated putting it down and every time I had to, I looked forward to picking it back up. While I did have some issues with the book, I still loved the book and my issues didn’t affect my rating.

I went into this book having no idea what it was about, knowing only that Malorie and her children could not look outside, and anything they did outside had to be done blindfolded. The book alternates between the present, the day Malorie and her children are preparing to leave the house they’ve lived in for four years, and the day in the past that Malorie learned she was pregnant. Not knowing anything about this book was so awesome. I loved learning more about what was going on bit by bit.

I did have a couple of issues (I didn’t like that the children weren’t named… that made no sense to me, and I was also confused about something that the news reports fairly early on because I couldn’t understand how they would possibly know that), but overall, those issues didn’t affect my rating. I still loved the book and highly recommend it. That said, there are some pretty gruesome scenes, so I would go into the book keeping that in mind.

I really hate how hard it is to write about books that you love, because I just want to throw this book at everyone and make them read it. XD Very happy that my book club picked this one out, and super excited for the discussion about it in a couple of weeks. :)

AHHH JUST READ IT. XD

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

Review: Random by Tom Leveen

RandomPublished: August 12, 2014 by Simon Pulse
Format: eBook
Pages: 224

Late at night Tori receives a random phone call.  It’s a wrong number.  But the caller seems to want to talk, so she stays on the line.

He asks for a single thing – one reason not to kill himself.

The request plunges her into confusion.  Because if this random caller actually does what he plans, he’ll be the second person connected to Tori to take his own life.  And the first just might land her in jail.  After her Facebook page became Exhibit A in a tragic national news story about cyberbullying, Tori can’t help but suspect that the caller is a fraud.  But what if he’s not?  Her words alone may hold the power of life or death.

With the clock ticking, Tori has little time to save a stranger – and maybe redeem herself – leading to a startling conclusion that changes everything…

I read Random while it was available on Pulse It. I was originally alerted to this title by a friend’s review earlier this year, so I was excited when it was available to read on Pulse It.

I haven’t read many other YA books on this topic, and I think it’s an important topic to cover. I was also intrigued that this particular title is told from the point of view of the bully, but in a way, it was also very frustrating, because Tori clearly doesn’t feel any remorse or feel like she was in the least responsible for what happened to someone she used to consider a friend. I couldn’t understand that at all, and I will admit that I had a REALLY hard time with that over the course of the story. I won’t say how things turn out for Tori or if her attitude changes, but this was something I really struggled with over the course of this book. Tori was very ME ME ME, and I hated it.

While I had a very complicated relationship with the main character of Random, I really enjoyed this book from a writing standpoint, and I liked the concept of the story. I also liked how the book showcased the way Tori’s actions affected her family. I thought that showed at least one side of the repercussions of what Tori had become involved with, even if Tori herself didn’t seem affected in a lot of ways. Overall, I enjoyed this despite my issues with Tori, and I think that it’s worth giving it a shot! I’m definitely looking forward to reading more of Leveen’s books in the future.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Review: The 100 Society by Carla Spradbery

The 100 SocietyPublished: September 4, 2014 by Hodder Children’s
Format: e-ARC
Pages: 317

For sixth-form student Grace Becker, The 100 Society is more than just a game; it’s an obsession.  Having convinced her five friends at Clifton Academy to see it through to the end, Grace will stop at nothing to carry out the rules of the game: tagging 100 locations around the city.  With each step closer to the 100-mark they get, the higher the stakes become.  But when the group catches the attention of a menacing stalker – the Reaper – he seems intent on exposing their illegal game, tormenting Grace with anonymous threats and branding their dormitory doors with his ominous tag.

As the once tight-knit group slowly unravels, torn apart by doubt and the death of a student, they no longer know who to trust.

With time running out, Grace must unmask the Reaper before he destroys everything she cares about for ever…

I have really mixed feelings about this book. I enjoyed it enough to finish it in a couple of days, but I had a lot of issues with it, too. The beginning of the book was pretty interesting and wonderfully creepy, but after that, it lost a lot of steam. The pacing slowed down quite a bit and I found myself feeling like I didn’t necessarily need to continue on, but I did, and while the pacing does pick back up quite a lot, the book was unfortunately missing a lot of things that I craved from this story.

I wanted a lot more background about The 100 Society, Clifton Academy, Grace’s family and life in general, Grace’s friendship with Daniel, and Grace herself. The supporting characters had their quirks and stood out from each other well enough, but more about them would have been nice, too. What we were given was pretty basic on all counts. I was initially super overwhelmed when all of Grace’s friends were introduced within a couple of pages of one another, as well, haha. I was left reeling, though, when I realized probably three-quarters of the way through the book that I had no idea what Grace looked like. I realize that readers will read a description and still apply their own mental image of what the characters look like, sometimes regardless of the description on the page, but not knowing what Grace looked like made it kind of hard for me to visualize some scenes, even if I put my imagined Grace in the scenes in my head.

I really wanted to know more about The 100 Society, the group’s previous tags, and more about Grace’s brother’s history with the 100 Society. I think that could have been really interesting to help the reader draw some parallels between their involvement, but we weren’t really given enough information to do that.

I also had a hard time believing some of the situations/characters’ reactions in this book, and found it extremely frustrating as a reader that a lot of the drama in the book could have been avoided if someone had just alerted the proper authorities. I get that they could have been expelled, but at a certain point, I think being expelled would be preferable to the alternative… but apparently these characters didn’t think so!

There was also the inclusion of a YA trope that I really hate, and it felt really tacked on in this story, and that was a major disappointment for me. :(

All of my issues aside, though, The 100 Society was a fun read, and though the pacing may not have been the most consistent thing about it, it was still a pretty quick read regardless. I’ll admit there were a few reveals surrounding the mystery that left me very confused and trying to do mental gymnastics to match my guesses with what Grace was thinking, but overall I enjoyed it. So in the end, I guess I had a lot of issues with this book… but still liked it.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  Thank you for the opportunity to read this book!

Rating: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Review: Sparrow Hill Road by Seanan McGuire

Sparrow Hill Road (Ghost Stories, #1)Published: May 6, 2014 by DAW
Pages: 312
Format: Paperback

Rose Marshall died in 1952 in Buckley Township, Michigan, run off the road by a man named Bobby Cross – a man who had sold his soul to live forever, and intended to use her death to pay the price of his immortality.  Trouble was, he didn’t ask Rose what she thought of the idea.

It’s been more than sixty years since that night, and she’s still sixteen, and she’s still running.

They have names for her all over the country: the Girl in the Diner.  The Phantom Prom Date.  The Girl in the Green Silk Gown.  Mostly she just goes by “Rose,” a hitchhiking ghost girl with her thumb out and her eyes fixed on the horizon, trying to outrace a man who never sleeps, never stops, and never gives up on the idea of claiming what’s his.  She’s the angel of the overpass, she’s the darling of the truck stops, and she’s going to figure out a way to win her freedom.  After all, it’s not like it can kill her.

You can’t kill what’s already dead.

I found Sparrow Hill Road at the bookstore when I was picking out books for my birthday present from my parents. I’ve read and loved several of Seanan McGuire’s other books, and I definitely don’t regret one of her books being a birthday buy.

For those familiar with the InCryptid books (Discount ArmageddonMidnight Blue-Light Special, etc.), Rose’s story takes place in the same universe, and while some of the characters from that story are mentioned very rarely (the Healy family), I have only read Discount Armageddon so far and didn’t feel that I was necessarily missing anything. I do think that someone who is more familiar with the universe will definitely appreciate the mentions, though!

Going into Sparrow Hill Road, it is necessary to mention that it was originally serialized. Due to the original format, there is a lot of repetition across the stories, so if that’s something that you as a reader wouldn’t be able to look past and would get horribly annoyed by, Sparrow Hill Road may not be for you. That said, there is a really awesome story here, so it would be a shame.

The collection opens up with “The Dead Girl in the Diner,” and the story completely blew me away and even made me cry. It was creepy, sad, and awesome all at once. While some of the following stories didn’t grab me quite as much as that one did, they all showed us another piece of Rose’s world, and I really liked what I was seeing. I will warn potential readers that the stories don’t seem to have a connection between them until about halfway through. At that point, the skips through time between stories becomes much smaller and each story is more closely linked to the one before it.

While I liked the short story-esque aspect of the collection, it also has the downfall that, for the most part, once a story concludes, the reader doesn’t feel a huge need to continue on to the next one until they want to know what Rose is going to get herself into next time. I think this is basically just because of the original way the story was told, so be prepared for the beginnings of most of the stories to slow down a bit, but I will say that once each story gets going, it’s hard to put down again.

My only complaint in terms of the writing (which I’m not factoring into my rating) is that a lot of the terms of this world are mentioned and then not really explained. While it can be gleaned from the text what and who these terms refer to, I personally found it a bit overwhelming at first. I was happy to discover that there is a field guide at the back of the book which explains some of them in more depth (however, there are some minor spoilers in the explanations, as a warning). My confusion with the terms may be related to not having read other stories from this universe, though, and the field guide at the back of the book cleared up the grand majority of my questions. I also admit that it would probably be a little strange for Rose to need to explain them, since they are and always have been a part of her world.

I LOVED the idea of the different layers of America, and the ghostroads, and the twilight and midnight and daylight and all of it. I just… I can barely express how much I loved it. Such an awesome idea and McGuire does awesome things with it. I was completely entranced by the imagery of the several layers of America, and I just… AHHH, I just loved it. So awesome. Overall, I found this to be a really enjoyable collection, and I’m really looking forward to (hopefully) seeing where Rose’s story goes next!

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

Review: The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

The Girl With All the GiftsPublished: June 10, 2014 by Orbit
Pages: 407
Format: Hardcover

Every morning, Melanie waits in her cell to be collected for class.

When they come for her, Sergeant Parks keeps his gun pointing at her while two of his people strap her into the wheelchair.  She thinks they don’t like her.  She jokes that she won’t bite.  But they don’t laugh.

Melanie is a very special girl.

It was so awesome going into this book not really knowing what it was about or anything else about it. It made the beginning especially so much more awesome.

I saw The Girl With All the Gifts advertised in GoodReads’ ads on my phone and filed the title away in my brain for another day, and then a little while after it came out, it became one of my birthday book picks. I was very excited when it was chosen for my online book club, and while my expectations were fairly high, I was not disappointed.

I fell in love with the first few chapters of this book as I learned about the world and the people bit by bit through Melanie’s eyes, and while I was a bit jarred and disappointed by the changes of POV that take place after the first few chapters, I eventually grew accustomed to it and didn’t mind quite as much later on. I loved Melanie’s POVs and she was definitely a part of what made this book so awesome for me.

There’s also a lot of science in this book, and though I will admit that in parts, it went over my head, I enjoyed what I understood. It was really interesting in parts, and I liked that it felt plausible, or at least was explained in such a way that it did. I loved that the mystery here was unveiled bit by bit through science and through the characters’ experiences and observations.

As I mentioned before, I was originally disappointed by the multiple POVs. I was also a bit tripped up by the present tense, at least initially. Instead of flowing in my mind, it really stood out to me and I had a hard time getting past it at first, but eventually the story seemed to flow with it a bit better, and I didn’t mind so much after I’d read a bit more of the book.

It’s really hard to talk about books that blew you away, but I loved how everything came together. Even though it’s been a week since I finished this book, Melanie is still in my head. I can’t stop thinking about her.

Rating: 4.5 stars