Review: Glass by Ellen Hopkins

Glass (Crank, #2)Published: June 20, 2008 by Margaret K. McElderry Books
Pages: 720
Format: Kindle Edition

This review is for the second book in the Crank series.  There are spoilers for the first book in the blurb.  My review of the first book is here.

Crank. Glass. Ice. Crystal. Whatever you call it, it’s all the same: a monster. And once it’s got hold of you, this monster will never let you go.

Kristina thinks she can control it. Now with a baby to care for, she’s determined to be the one deciding when and how much, the one calling the shots. But the monster is too strong, and before she knows it, Kristina is back in its grips. She needs the monster to keep going, to face the pressures of day-to-day life. She needs it to feel alive.

Once again the monster takes over Kristina’s life and she will do anything for it, including giving up the one person who gives her the unconditional love she craves – her baby.

Glass was pretty similar in tone and style to its predecessor. It picks up a short time after the events of Crank. This book is also written in verse (I believe all of Hopkins’ books are, though I could be wrong), which made for a relatively quick read, if not necessarily easy, due to the subject matter.

In terms of format and layout, Glass was easier to read than the first book. I guess the poem layout was maybe a little less creative, but it definitely helped me understand the flow of the words better, and I didn’t need to do nearly as much rereading as I did during the first book. There were a few things that I wasn’t sure were intentional – italics generally seemed to be used for dialog, but sometimes, in the middle of what appeared to be someone’s sentence, they would be dropped, and then come back again. Not sure if that’s a mistake or not. So in a lot of ways, the paperback would probably still be easier to read than the eBook, but there were improvements made in that department. I ended up reading the book with my Kindle on its side with the font at the smallest size, and that seemed to preserve 90% of the originally intended layout.

Kristina’s choices over the course of the book are predictable, but frustrating. As with the first book, knowing it is based on a true story is difficult and sad. My only real issue with the book itself was that the dialog didn’t seem realistic to me a lot of the time – sometimes, it was great, and other times, I felt like it was a major miss and Kristina didn’t feel like an authentic teenager. Crank had some of the same issues, though, and I guess it would have been even more jarring to change some of that in the second book.

I am interested in continuing the series and seeing where it goes from here (have the third book on my Kindle from the library right now).

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

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